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The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted many social and civil shortcomings, but thankfully, it has also provided a much needed change in perspectives, sometimes from unexpected corners of life. Overall, while adjusting to the pandemic, daily anxiety levels are on the rise. Now we must shift to mitigate the spread of Covid-19 through the emerging cold and flu season as the winter season sets. Entering a new wave of the pandemic requires us to stay the course with our behavioral changes in hygiene, as well as, maintaining social distancing measures. Coping with the changes faced has put into sharp relief the much needed global focus on mental health. 

The sustained stressors, like public health, social institutions, and the environmental changes, increase anxiety and fear for many. The emotions that some individuals have expressed during this pandemic, highlight a reality that individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) live with every day. During OCD Awareness Week we recognize millions of individuals who experience the restrictive fears that OCD, and their various coping behaviors, creating barriers to moving and living freely in the world.


OCD affects about 1% of the population in the United States or 2.2 million Americans each year (visit adaa.org for more facts and statistics on anxiety disorders). With many experiencing the onset of symptoms in their late teens. The realities of managing Covid-19 and the ramifications of a health scare may impact some individuals more than others. Especially, if fears are centered around contagion and the cold season demands of extra hand cleaning and disinfection against germs. This can lead people to a predisposition of developing compulsive behaviors around staying clean. Young adults are a vulnerable age group during the pandemic particularly since the social networks that help strengthen emotional development are constrained and are now more restricted through remote learning.  

Psychiatrists have continued to work with OCD patients during the pandemic using effective cognitive-behavioral treatments, yet the nature of the virus has curtailed some of those efforts. Ketamine Health Centers (KHC) can support a traditional CBT with alternative approaches. Ketamine infusion therapy, for example, works at the neurological level to help dislodge old, repetitive behaviors as one is practicing new behavioral patterns through cognitive behavior therapy. The majority of patients claim instantly diminished symptoms early into treatment, which is what makes this treatment option unique. KHC can provide a combination of procedures to augment your existing treatment plan. 

Thankfully, many OCD patients have felt little change as a direct result of the pandemic simply because their fears are of a different nature. For some, other fear factors are more immediate than the concerns brought to bear by the pandemic. Yet anxiety, just as mental health in general, works along a spectrum. Before the year began many individuals were already in a fragile place for anxiety and depression. The many layers of difficulties (health, economic, social, emotional) and the ongoing need to re-establish new states of “normal” is too great a challenge to carry alone.


Ketamine Health Centers can provide relief through alternative treatment for an array of mental health concerns. We encourage a multifaceted approach to mental health. Contact our highly trained professionals, at one of our conveniently located clinics, to discuss new treatment options that can strengthen your current practice or take you in a new direction for effective treatment. Set up your free consultation today!

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